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Art Deco Club Chairs

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Art Deco Club Chairs

If you’re in the market for a bold, streamlined club chair there’s no better option than an Art Deco Club Chair. While traditional club chairs can feel boxy and visually heavy, Art Deco Arm Chairs convey a lightness thanks the their modern forms and aerodynamic curves. While there’s an endless number of Art Deco Style Chairs to choose from, there a few general styles worth knowing: Danish Art Deco Club Chairs, French Art Deco Club Chairs, and Italian Art Deco Club Chairs. While each style shares some characteristics and there’s no textbook definition of any, there are a few hallmarks that can be most closely associated with each. For instance, if you’re looking for channel tufting, Danish Art Deco Chairs are likely to be your best bet. In the 1940s, numerous Danish manufacturers produced Art Deco Arm Chairs. Often featuring exposed, polished wood frames, although not exclusively, Danish Art Deco Chairs usually feature gently curved backs and over-stuffed proportions which put their channel tufting on full display. While Danish Art Deco Club Chairs tend to be comfy and cozy in style, French Art Deco Armchairs are usually a bit more elegant and refined looking. Many will feature upholstered seats and backs, with open air arms crafted of a highly polished wood. Often the seats of these chairs will feature a tilt, giving the chair a more aerodynamic form. To up the drama, French Art Deco Club Chair’s wood arms are often sculpted, giving the chair further streamline appeal. Lastly, there Italian Art Deco Club Chairs. If you think of the hard points and peaks Italian designer Gio Ponti was known for, it’s easy to differentiate Italian Art Deco Club Chairs. Most feature the same streamlined form as French Club Chairs, but they’re often more outwardly modern than their French counterparts. Look for details like atomic legs or winged arms, which are often an obvious indication of Italian origin.

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