LA BELLA VITA OF ITALIAN MODERNISM

There is no shortage of ink-spilled in homage to Italian design of the 20th century, and for good reason. It was a century of innovative and dynamic work which only served to further cement Italy as a global creative force. But what makes this era’s design so enduring? Why are original pieces so coveted? The style still so echoed by modern manufacturers? Articles still penned on it? Perhaps it’s the fact that Italian modernism is amorphous. It’s equal parts spare and dramatic; pragmatic and artistic. While it’s nearly impossible to define this era by the work of just a few designers and makers, we’ve chosen a selection of designers whose work each represents a different peak of this creatively rich period. With this framework for 100 years’ worth of groundbreaking design, we turn our lens to some of the leaders of the era.

Read More

A JAW-DROPPING MURANO GLASS DISCOVERY CHANGED THESE DEALERS’ LIVES

It goes without saying that most lifetime winnings—from a lifetime supply of Cineplex tickets to an expiration-less subscription to National Geographic—don’t elicit much envy. Doug Taylor and Ed Sexton’s lifetime haul is a bit different. In 2006 the couple stumbled across a motherlode of Murano glass stashed in a dilapidated New Jersey warehouse (yes, cue the swoon). The couple, who previously worked in sales and real estate, had no hesitation about what to do with their findings: they shipped the lamps to Little Rock, Arkansas and opened the now renowned Swank Lighting.

Read More

DEALER INTROSPECTIVE: ITALIAN MODERNISM GLAM

Tell a friend you’re in the market for Mid-Century Modern furniture and they’re likely to get Eames chairs in their eyes. But for others, like Patricia Kagan, there is another side to 20th Century furniture design; one which skews bit more luxe, a bit more dolce vita, if you will. Patricia, a 20th Century Modernism enthusiast and owner of the masterfully-curated vintage shop mrspk&oz, has dedicated years to the collecting the exclusivities of Mid 20th Century design. Among her biggest preoccupations? Italian Modernism and its lesser-known cousin, Italian Modern Glam. Read More